http://www.renaissance-spell.com/Images/Renaissance-Weapons/Renaiss...
What is the earliest evidence of distinct and possible blunderbusses that you all can post?

I have an early 18th century reproduction and it has been more fun that I expected so I would like to see how far back I can find examples and what they look like.

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https://p1.liveauctioneers.com/306/53583/25844025_2_x.jpg?version=1...

LOT 0375 DETAILS
French style blunderbuss, having a relief decorated brass barrel centered with a shield and fleur de lys reserves, oak stock with original surface, 23"l

I am not sure that this dragon mouthed matchlock is a blunderbuss but it is cool enough to share here. 

It was exhibited at the Utah Gun Collectors Association October 2001 Gun Show, and labeled "Matchlock Carbine circa 1490".

http://www.ugca.org/ugca1001/ugca1001main.htm

The top and 3rd matchlocks look promising. 

This is the same rack of guns but it shows the barrel plug in the 2nd from the top better.  The plug appears larger than the middle of the barrel which makes this one look like a real blunderbuss with a flaring bore.  The top and  3rd , on the other hand, seems to have  straight bores from this angle. 

I just acquired this bronze hand mortar barrel.  It was too good of a price to pass up.  It is untapped/drilled so I am looking at possible earlier locks and stocks to get some possible Landsknect-SCA use out of it.  It is "tennis ball gauge." 

Any suggestions?   A documentable matchlock would be nice. 

Hmmmm....? 

http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=12091

Got these pics from a pal who took them in Schloss Gottorp, the Schleswig Holstein Museum.

He did not give any measurements but, neglecting the replacement stock, I would estimate the length of the barrels to ca. 50-60 cm.

Please note the rectangularly raised priming pans that seem to be characteristic of the North of Germany and the early 15th century.

The recoil hook was perfect for firing them from behind a a large set targe or a hand targe in field fight. It is the only DB sample known to me to have survived from that early period.

This piece is also remarkable for its angled barrels designed to cover a broader range, and possibly loaded with a 'buckshot' like number of balls or pieces of lead or iron, in one word: blunder.

Best, Michael
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I am not sure how good this company is or isn't but it is pretty hard to mess up a matchlock http://www.mksikligar.com/Gun-Locks2.aspx 

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