I am curious how everyone made their hats. The few I made myself are complete disasters.. mainly looking like a seagull landed and died on my head.

So how did you make yours? And tips and tricks?

Cheers,
Dorothea

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I also want to know. I´ve seen different ways to make hats, from using straw hats and "clothing" them with "kläde" (cloth made of wool), to felted hats. My hat is a small felted hat that i cut slits in and sew on some silk. Very basic and no historical likness.
I used the instructions that I've attached. Though I couldn't find a macrame hoop and used two wraps of plastic boning for my first hat. For my second I took some advice from another Landsknecht recreator and used an old brim from a straw hat. I intend to try one of heavy felted wool once I can get some material of appropriate weight.
I tend to not look for very heavy wool as I am heat sensitive. I'm always looking for someone to act as a heat sink. I can be rather popular at cold events. 8^p
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oer that sounds very complicated. i'm afraid I used a straw hat brim cut in for and covered. the main bit was a circle pleated onto a band going round the head and the brim sewn on after. A big cheat tho it seemed to work oh and ad feathers!
Thanks for that Uadahlrich! I'll give it a go!
Oh my god! Those are my instructions...*giggle* I am assuming you got them here: www.fahnlein.com ? I was taught to make them this way by a fellow DHF member, Becky Doherty. I think her mom came up with the original idea for this version.

Let me know if they worked OK for you, or if they neede some correcting!
I'm not exactly sure where I got them it's been so long ago. If they are your instructions I give you full credit and thank you most profusely. As I said earlier this was my very first attempt at any kind of hat and even I was able to make a wonderful one in around 2 hours. I actually like the "flop" of the brim I got by using the plastic boning instead of the brass hoop. The only thing I changed when I made my second one was to use a brim from an old straw hat and sewed it inside the new hat brim. My new one gets major compliments but my old one is still drawing comments from people. Just this past weekend I got some more nice words about it even with it's 4 year+ feathers.
Thanks again!
No worries, I am happy to share any information I have! I am glad to hear that the hats suited you well, and that you have found a number of ways to make them work.
Also, I am guessing you are talking about making the Tellerbarret (large brimmed flat hat) rather than the Steuchlein or Bundlein (mushroom shaped hats)?
That's the one! Attached picture 1 is old hat. Left over material from bedroom curtains.
The hat that matches the waffenrok is the new one.
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i love mine, it was made for me using the straw hat idea, it looks great, keeps the sun off me and the chicks dig it!!.....must be all the feathers
Hi, we use this instruction a basis so far (only in german, sorry). You can variate the brim consruction for example.

http://www.frummes-faehnlein.de/handarbeiten/anleitungen/barett/bar...
well Dottty, you know how I have made my hats... :)
But anyway … my first hat was a tellerbarret and there I used the brim of a straw hat as a base.
Hower I have ”heard” rumours that back in the days they used bark from willow trees to stiffen the hats.
As far as I understand the stripped bark was cut in long thin strips and when steamed the strips became sticky. So they were woven into a web, glued together by the tree sap that got sticky from the steam.
aparently it would not become undone if rained on – only through warm water/steam...
The truth in this has NOT been verified – this is very much a rumour!
I have tried to find sources but not suceeded this far.
anybody else that has heard this?

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